Escape Reality – Alcatraz

Its been a while since I posted a review.. longer than i would have liked anyway, laptop breaking, plus having exams and assignments due in and working two jobs means ive been really busy over the last few weeks. It’s all done with now though so i can get back to reviewing and escaping! Keep an eye out for quite a few reviews coming up over the next few weeks 🙂

Game date: 13/06/2017

Where: Leeds

Theme: 

“In 1934, Alcatraz transformed into a maximum high-security prison housing the most infamous and dangerous criminals. Situated in the chilly waters of San Francisco Bay, no prisoner has ever successfully escaped. Alcatraz has just reached its maximum capacity for the first time in history – because of you. 
 You are all masters of escaping and no prison has managed to contain you. As highly skilled individuals you have been plotting your escape plan and now the time has arrived. A diversion has been caused by other inmates and the warden has sprinted off to help, leaving you in your cells unguarded. This is your prime opportunity to make your escape attempt. Can you escape before he returns and catches you?”

There isn’t a huge amount I can say about this room without giving things away, however like most of the rooms here, it had been finished to a high standard, and contained everything you would expect from a prison, the cells were well done and contained a bed, toilet/sinks and shelves with a variety of different games and possessions on them. We found the theming of the cells actually created quite a few red herrings, however im not sure if these were intentional or not. As we got further out of the prison, the game changed to reflect this, and most of the puzzles in some way related to the back story, and what we were actually doing in the game. The exit out of the cells was a highlight for me, and fit well into the story.

 

The game:

The game itself was enjoyable, not the best game we have played at escape reality, but still fun and worth playing. A lot of teamwork was required towards the start of this game, and we were doing quite well to start with, the first puzzle in this game had us both doing something, but after this, Paul spent a long time stood around doing nothing This was however, mainly our fault, as we had overlooked something we should really have thought of, and I spent far too long trying to figure things out before asking for a clue. If it wasnt for this, it would have more than likely only been a few minutes where he had nothing to do.

The next part we found a little tricky, the puzzle itself wasnt overly difficult, however Paul was the only one who could really complete this properly, and whilst i tried to help, this was very difficult to do when i wasnt looking at the entire thing myself. We ended up asking for another clue, and he soon got the hang of it and we were on our way.  A team of 4 would have made this section of the game a lot easier. We didn’t really get tripped up from this point on, and the rest of the puzzles were fun and easy enough to solve – which was lucky as we had spent so much time on the first part of the game! As with most of the games we have played here, this one was very linear, and again the puzzles had the numbered QR codes next to them so we always knew which our next puzzle was. The game had a mix of logic, math, observation and code-breaking, and like all of the games here, quite a few practical elements that we really enjoyed solving.

I would recommend 2 players for experienced players, however if you are not too confident working on your own then I would take 4. New players should be ok with 4 or 5, but may struggle with a few of the puzzles in there.

Host, briefing and clue system:

Like the other rooms we played here, you get an iPad with your timer on it, and you can also use it to scan QR codes next to the puzzles and get a hint, but doing this has a time penalty which is added on to your final escape time. It also shows you how many puzzles will be in the game. 4 games in and we still haven’t used the iPad, preferring to stick to the penalty free hint system of having our host come into the room.  If you haven’t read my previous reviews about Escape Reality, when you escape you have to use the iPad to scan an exit code, which then records your time, and I still think this is most stressful part of the game, and a very anxious couple of seconds while you try to line up the iPad, so make sure you have the iPad in your hands when you leave or you will find yourself running back for it!

Callum was our host, and again, he was great, really friendly and helpful, made us feel welcome, and was always straight into the room when we needed a hint, he was waiting for us outside when we escaped, and chatted to us for ages about the rooms after our game (he must be getting sick of seeing us by now though!)

Did we escape?

Yes! In 53:56

alcetraz

 

Booking and prices:

We booked online, you can book several different rooms or time slots at once, just make sure you click on the right location as they are all on the same website!

Price:

2 Players – £44 (£22.00 each)
3 Players – £60 (£20.00 each)
4 Players – £72 (£18.00 each)
5 Players – £85 (£17.00 each)
6 Players – £96 (£16.00 each)

Website:

www.escapereality.com

Escape-Hull Casino

Game date: 08/06/2017

Where: Hull

Theme:

“As if escaping the casino wasn’t challenging enough the room is filled with additional puzzles that hold rewards. Should you stay or should you go? You won’t get rich without taking the risk…”

There wasn’t a huge amount of back story to this room, it’s a pretty simple concept, your goal is to break into a casino to steal as many chips as possible, then get out before your time is up. This room had been done really well, and it looked almost just like a real casino, with a bar, roulette wheel, poker table, fruit machines and various other games, every one of these had been incorporated into the game in some way. A lot of effort had been put into making this look like a real casino, and it was one of the more immersive rooms we have played at Escape-Hull. Every single puzzle was casino related in some way, and you actually had to play some of the games to solve the puzzles which added a whole other level to the immersion.

The game:

This would be our last game at Escape-Hull (unless they decide to open any more rooms) and again, like all the others, we played it with two. This was our fourth escape room today, and we were getting a little tired, and we struggled a bit to get going in this room.

Casino is different to the other rooms here, and you can potentially have the full hour in the room. The goal was to break into the vault in the casino, and steal as many chips you could, then escape before the hour was up. Your escape time was counted as when you managed to get into the vault, and in there was the door to get out the room, which you could leave through at any time, depending on how brave you were feeling. We decided to figure out how to get the key with 5 minutes remaining, but didn’t leave the room until the last 10 seconds. Before you got into the vault, there were a number of puzzles with small key safes spread throughout the room, solving one of these puzzles would open the key safe, and give you a key to a locker inside the vault (there were also a few of these keys hidden within the room) A bit of advise if you play this room, try to leave these puzzles until you have got into the vault! We were solving them from the start, and it really increased the time it took us to get into the vault (which they have a leaderboard for) Once in the vault you can start solving the remaining puzzles, and collecting the keys to open the lockers and collect the chips.

The flow in the room good, if not a little strange, as the puzzles to access the vault were linear, but the additional puzzles to access the lockers werent, some of them did need to be solved before others, as some of the lockers held different items needed to solve some of them, but a lot of the extra puzzles could be accessed from the start. We had ended up getting quite a few locker keys before we had entered the vault. I did like this as it meant that if you got stuck on one of the main puzzles, you had something else to do, or if you play as a larger group, it gives everyone something to do whilst people are working on the main ones, but it also distracts from what you should be doing, I think we could have easily got into the vault within 20-30 minutes if we hadn’t been distracted solving other things. The puzzles were a good mix, observation, math/number, logic and a small amount of practical, with a little bit of searching to be done, there wasnt a huge amount to find, but the things that we did find were very cleverly hidden, and could be easily missed even after several searches. This room was a lot of fun, there were a few unique puzzles in here, including the fruit machine one which was really clever, and something we hadnt seen done.

We managed to open almost all of the lockers, the remaining ones were due to missing something very simple when rushing about, another I had actually solved the puzzle but not gone back to put the code in, and the final one was virtually impossible, when our host showed us the puzzle afterwards, he told us that no groups had ever solved this one, and he didn’t understand himself how you worked it out. The puzzle was something that anyone is very very unlikely to ever get, and you also don’t get any clues on how to solve this, and considering no one has ever done it, it looks a lot like it was only put there to stop people getting the maximum amount of chips from the game.

I did really like that even though we got into the vault after 38 minutes, we still got the full hour inside the room and there was still a lot of other things to do, I just wished afterwards that we had focused on getting to the vault and come back to solve the other puzzles later, rather than solving them as we went along. We definitely got our moneys worth in this room!

I would recommend 4-6 for new players, it would be a good first room, as there is virtually no chance of not getting out, and there is plenty to do in here and considering no one has yet managed to solve one puzzle in there, you wont run out of things to do, it also means you can get a lot more chips, leave a few people to work on the linear aspect of the room, whilst the rest of the group searches and solves the extra puzzles. For experienced players I would still recommend 2-3.

Host, briefing and clue system:

Alex was our host, we had met him previously at Escape-Doncaster when we played the two rooms there, and I had mentioned that he seemed very nervous, and sent far too many clues (to the point that we were ignoring them) However he was great for this game, we only had a few clues, and they came when we really needed them. He wasnt at all nervous and chatted to us after the game.

Like the previous rooms, clues were delivered to the TV screen in the room, although once we got into the vault, we found a walkie-talkie and clues were then delivered via that. I’m not sure if I mentioned it in my previous reviews, but Escape-Hulls clue system can send actual images to the screen aswell as text, which makes things a lot easier, it also means that they can point you in the right direction, without actually giving away what you need to do.

Did we escape?

Yes! In 38:56 with 140 chips (As I mentioned before, your escape time that is recorded is the time it takes you to break into the vault)

Casino

 

Booking and prices:

You can book online, and there is a phone number on the website so you may be able to book over the phone. I like the booking system they use, as it lets you add multiple rooms to the same booking.

Price: 

Two players – £48 (£24pp)

Three players – £57 (£19pp)

Four players – £64 (£16pp)

Five players – £70 (£14pp)

Website:

www.escape-hull.co.uk

Escape-Hull EMCU Trials

Game date: 08/06/2017

Where: Hull

Theme:

“The Escape Mysterious Crimes Unit are recruiting and they need you. Having worked through your training you now only have the test to complete. A simple sit down multiple choice test should be easy. Surely that isn’t all that is involved!”

I was really excited about playing this room, the story sounded very much like the film ‘the exam’ which I used to love, so I was quite pleased when some of the layout of the room turned out to be similar.

This room was well decorated, I don’t think there’s a huge amount you can do with an exam room theme, but it was clean, well-lit and had everything you would expect in there. Whilst not the immersive room ever, it worked well and there was plenty of space. It started off as a sort of spy school with a number of tech and gadgets, and progressed to the exam area which had single desks like the kind in American classrooms, each with our tests on them, and a larger desk at the front for the examiner.

The game:

As with all the games we have played here so far, we played this one as a two. I’m very glad we did, I think if we had a larger number of us, we would have completed the game far too quickly. I really enjoyed playing this game, again, it wasn’t the most immersive room, and I’m not sure what could have been done to improve this, as the decoration and puzzles were both done well. The slight lack of immersion wasn’t an issue and it didn’t affect our enjoyment of the game at all, I was just something I was aware of throughout the game.

One reason I liked this game so much, is that I got all the puzzles in it really well, and I felt a little bad for my partner, as I got a lot of the puzzles pretty quickly, before he had chance to try to figure them out himself. The flow of the room was amazing, while linear in parts, a lot of it wasnt and there was quite a large amount that could be done in any order. We flew through the room, and we never spent too long on anything to become frustrated, we didn’t need many clues, and once we got going we just solved puzzle after puzzle, this room really just played to my strengths and was great fun.

We weren’t as quick to start off with, the puzzles involving the gadgets took us a little longer, and we also came across our first ever morse code puzzle, which took us a while to get exactly right,  but towards the latter parts of the game we really sped up. Halfway through the game, the style of puzzles completely changed, which really gave the impression we were progressing into a different section of the test. I felt really good in this room, its nice to find a room now and again where you just get everything, it gives you a great feeling of satisfaction when solving things. The puzzles themselves involved code-breaking, number, logic, a small amount of physical and a lot of observation, they were all on theme and fit into the story, and there was a fair bit of searching to be done, but not always for physical objects. We didn’t really get stuck on anything, until we reached the final puzzle, and here we had actually figured out what to do, but hadn’t found the correct order to do it yet, and we probably spent more time on this one and the morse code puzzle combined than the rest of the entire room, despite this it was something original and we enjoyed solving it  All the puzzles were perfectly logical, and were fun and satisfying to solve. This would be a good room for new players, as it has a good variety of puzzles, and I would recommend 4 players, and two for experienced players.

Host, briefing and clue system:

The same as our other games here, Mike was our game host, and again he ran our game very well, we didn’t need much help at all in this room, but im sure if we had needed clues, they would have come just when we needed them. Like the previous rooms, clues were delivered to the TV screen in the room, and again Mike was happy to chat with us after the game.

Did we escape?

Yes! In 49:21 

lp;kl;

 

Booking and prices:

You can book online, and there is a phone number on the website so you may be able to book over the phone. I like the booking system they use, as it lets you add multiple rooms to the same booking.

Price: 

Two players – £48 (£24pp)

Three players – £57 (£19pp)

Four players – £64 (£16pp)

Five players – £70 (£14pp)

Website:

www.escape-hull.co.uk

Escape-Hull Sherlock/221B Baker Street

Game date: 08/06/2017

Where: Hull

Theme:

“Having been enlisted by Moriarty, your task is to break into 221B Baker Street, defeat Sherlock’s failsafes and retrieve an item of historic importance. Hurry though, Sherlock and Dr Watson are hot on your tail!”

Theres not a huge amount I can say on the theme, decoration was good, it was basically Sherlock’s living room, this section was done well, and the decor fit with the era in which it was set, however the later parts of the game were a bit bare and more could have been done with these, but this didn’t really have an impact on the game as it was only a small part of it. There was an extra objective to this room, we had to steal Sherlock’s hat, but we actually managed to open the door before doing this, and had to go back for it. By the end of the game, we had pretty much forgotten about the hat, whilst the actual game was fun, the hat didn’t really interest us, and I feel like the item of historic importance could have been something more interesting.

The game:

One game down, 3 to go, Sherlock was our second room here today, we played with 2, which like the rest of the rooms we have played here, was the perfect number for us. We had two objectives in this room, to escape, and to find and steal an item belonging to sherlock. Like a lot of the rooms we have played with both Escape-Hull and Doncaster, the starting puzzle was right in front of us, but it was also a place we never think to look, as we always assume its decoration. Once we figured this out, we got going a lot quicker, the room wasnt too difficult, and flowed well, it even had a few audio puzzles which was a nice change as we don’t often come across these.. The puzzles were logical and fun to solve, and we got most of them pretty well, although we did waste some time trying to figure out a number of long riddles we had collected throughout the game, however it turned out that we didn’t actually need to do this. We also came across one puzzle that was identical to one in the Da Vinci room at Escape-Doncaster, but luckily this was the only one, and nothing of major importance. The puzzles were mainly on theme, and contained a mix of number, observation, logic and code-breaking, and a we had to do a little bit of searching. None of the puzzles were hugely memorable, but they were fun, well thought out and satisfying to solve, and we enjoyed this room alot.

This would be a good room for new players, and I would recommend a team of 4, while experienced players should be fine as a two.

Host, briefing and clue system:

The same as our last game, Mike was our game host, and again he ran our game very well, we didn’t need a huge amount of clues in this room, but when we did, they were delivered at the perfect time. Like the previous rooms, clues were delivered to the TV screen in the room, and again Mike was happy to chat with us after the game.

Did we escape?

Yes! In 47:14 

Sherlock

 

Booking and prices:

You can book online, and there is a phone number on the website so you may be able to book over the phone. I like the booking system they use, as it lets you add multiple rooms to the same booking.

Price: 

Two players – £48 (£24pp)

Three players – £57 (£19pp)

Four players – £64 (£16pp)

Five players – £70 (£14pp)

Website:

www.escape-hull.co.uk

Escape-Hull The Darker Side Of Hull

Game date: 08/06/2017

Where: Hull

Theme:

You’re usually more than happy to take the night shift at Hull’s History Museum but after the disappearance of your colleague it’s certainly not where you want to be. Gather your team and delve deep into the museum to find out what happened to your colleague but be careful, you may discover more about Hull’s dark past than you wanted to”

The website advises Parental guidance due to this room featuring information on real murders that occurred in Hull (provided by local historian Mike Covell). Whilst being quite dark (which IS the theme of the room) it was quite interesting to actually learn a bit of Hull’s history whilst playing this room, and I can still remember some of the stories we learnt about in the room. It’s not every day you get a history lesson with your escape room!

This is the second museum themed room we have played, but unlike the hi-tech room The Heist we played at Enigma Doncaster, this was more of an old-fashioned museum. The room had a lot of padlocks and not much tech, but this made sense as it was a history museum after all. The room was well decorated, and was believable as a museum, the theme of it being quite nautical, and a lot of the exhibits and information focused on the fishing side of hull, with a huge old-fashioned anchor in there, several different types of model ships, boat tickets and tools. A few other aspects in focused on the timeline of events which happened in hull, dating back to the early 1200’s, listing key events in Hulls past, and the different kings and queens of the times. A lot of the ‘murder’ history was hidden to start with, and we uncovered more and more of this as we progressed in the game. The puzzles were all on theme, and a lot of the information and exhibits played a part in the actual puzzles, and were done in unique and interesting, but not instantly obvious ways.

The game:

This is our second visit to Escape-Hull, and we were booked in to play the remaining 4 games in a row. This game is for 2-5 players, we played with 2. I’m glad we played this room as a two, there was a lot to do, but I feel that with a larger number of people we would have got in each others way (this wont be the case for everyone, as there is plenty to do, and even as a team of 5 there would be something for everyone, but we like to do everything ourselves). Just having the two of us meant that the starting point of the game took us a bit longer, but it also made it more fun, a lot of teamwork was required here, and you really had to help each other out to progress in the game. We did really well in this room, we never hit any major road blocks, and flew through the room which flowed beautifully. We did get tripped up at one point down to our own stupidity, as we repeatedly kept getting two names mixed up, and spent ages trying to solve a puzzle using the wrong name, and both us and our host couldn’t understand why our code wasnt working, but eventually we clicked on and rectified our mistake (after giving ourselves a telling off for not enough paying attention) and we were back on track. There was a good variety of puzzles in this room, word, logic, practical, math, a lot of observation and quite a bit of searching. The puzzles were alot of fun, satisfying to solve, and each one gave us a little bit more information about the dark past of Hull. The way all the exhibits and actual facts in the museum had been incorporated into the puzzles was great, and we had alot of fun in this room.

This room shouldnt be too difficult for newbies, and I would recommend 4 or 5 players as there is a lot to do, experienced players should be fine with two.

Host, briefing and clue system:

The same as last time we were here, Mike was our game host, and again he ran our game very well, we didn’t need a huge amount of clues in this room, but when we did, they were delivered at the perfect time. Like the previous rooms, clues were delivered to the TV screen in the room, and again Mike was happy to chat with us after the game.

Did we escape?

Yes! In 50:43 

Darker side of hull

 

Booking and prices:

You can book online, and there is a phone number on the website so you may be able to book over the phone. I like the booking system they use, as it lets you add multiple rooms to the same booking,

Price: 

Two players – £48 (£24pp)

Three players – £57 (£19pp)

Four players – £64 (£16pp)

Five players – £70 (£14pp)

Website:

www.escape-hull.co.uk

Escape Reality – Jungala

Game date: 06/06/2017

Where: Leeds

Theme: 

“You have discovered an old board game in your attic and once opened you are engulfed by a vortex and transported into an alternative realm. After only seeing a glimpse of the terrible world inside you are thrown back into reality. Vowing never to approach the game again you attempt to leave but the door has been locked trapping you in. You have no choice but to complete the game or be trapped inside the other realm for eternity. You only have sixty minutes to complete the game or be trapped inside the other realm for eternity!”

The decoration in the living room section of this room was great, a room that could have been taken straight out of the 90’s, with flowery sofas and ornaments, and old-fashioned wall paper, and we felt like we were actually there in the living room playing the board game. The jungle section of this room wasnt as impressive, and I think a lot more could have been done with this section, the walls were painted completely black, with a few cobwebs on them. There was little in the way of decoration, a table, a few props and rocks scattered about. This section lacked that great sense of immersion that the living room part of the game created, and I feel they could have added something in here, although the puzzles were mostly well thought out and fit well with the theme.

 

The game:

Our second game of the day at Escape Reality, and now our second visit, the game is for 2-6 players, and again we played with 2.  Jungala is rated as the easiest game, the only one with 3 out of 5 stars, but we were warned that people actually found it more difficult than some of the ‘harder’ rooms, and the escape rate wasnt very high. We did end up needed in few clues in this room, some of them we probably could have managed without, as we had just not checked our working out, or overlooked a small detail.

The starting puzzle was immediately obvious, and we did that one pretty quickly, but after that we came across two puzzles where we knew what we had to do, but couldn’t figure out where to get some of the information from. It turned out we needed to use the same thing for both puzzles, but in a different way, and it was something that we didn’t even think to check as it seemed too simple! The puzzles in this room involved a lot of logic, some maths, practical and a small amount of code breaking and observation. There was a little bit of searching to be done, and most of the puzzles were really fun to solve, we got some of them straight away, but some of them had multiple ways in which they could have been done, and led to us over thinking a lot of the puzzles in this room. There was one puzzle in particular that was so simple we never would have got it on our own, and we spent a while trying to solve it in different ways. A puzzle towards the end also tripped us up, most of the puzzles in the room made sense, but this one wasnt very logical, and we had actually really enjoyed solving the first part of this puzzle, but the second part didnt make much sense to us and it was difficult to see how you would have got to this conclusion without a clue, as there was another was another way of doing it that seemed the far more obvious solution. This room actually took us longer and we needed more clues than the more difficult  Iron Kingdom room that we played before hand. Despite a small number of the puzzles being far too ambiguous, the majority were rewarding to solve, they had a good variety, and we enjoyed the slight practical element the game had.

The room was fun and is worth playing, but experienced players will need to be careful, as you are at risk of over thinking everything. For new players I would recommend 4 or 5 players, even though it’s the easiest room here, it is a little tricky in parts! For experienced players 2 or 3 should be enough.

 

Host, briefing and clue system:

Like the other rooms we played here, you get an iPad with your timer on it, and you can also use it to scan QR codes next to the puzzles and get a hint, but doing this has a time penalty which is added on to your final escape time. It also shows you how many puzzles will be in the game. 4 games in and we still havent used the iPad, preferring to stick to the penalty free hint system of having our host come into the room.  If you havent read my pervious reviews about Escape Reality, when you escape you have to use the iPad to scan an exit code, which then records your time, and I still think this is most stressful part of the game, and a very anxious couple of seconds while you try to line up the iPad, so make sure you have the iPad in your hands when you leave or you will find yourself running back for it!

Since writing my last review, I have checked who our game host was, and we had Callum for both this room and the Iron Kingdom. Again, he was great, really friendly and helpful, made us feel welcome, and was always straight into the room when we needed a hint, he was waiting for us outside when we escaped, and chatted to us for ages about the rooms after our game.

Did we escape?

Yes! In 54 minutes!

Jungala

Booking and prices:

We booked online, you can book several different rooms or time slots at once, just make sure you click on the right location as they are all on the same website!

Price:

2 Players – £44 (£22.00 each)
3 Players – £60 (£20.00 each)
4 Players – £72 (£18.00 each)
5 Players – £85 (£17.00 each)
6 Players – £96 (£16.00 each)

Escape Reality have a 20% discount code on their website, use ESCAPEREALITY20 when booking, it may not be around for long though!

Website:

www.escapereality.com

Escape Reality – The Iron Kingdom

Game date: 06/06/2017

Where: Leeds

Theme: 

“Within the largest continent of the world, known as the Iron Kingdom, there exists seven noble families. In the heart of this Kingdom lies the Throne, the main source of conflict between everybody in the land. Whoever sits on the Throne rules the entire continent, a position desired by many, a position in which people will go to extreme lengths to hold. News has quickly spread over the land suggesting that the new King is not the rightful heir to the throne. The discovery has caused an eruption throughout the Seven Kingdoms and a battle for the throne has broken out. You must find out who is the rightful heir to the throne. Who are you going to support? Which house are you going to fight for?”

This room is definitely the best ‘medieval’ room I have played. The room had a lot more padlocks than the other two rooms we have played here, which we expected due to the theme, keypads and switches would have looked really out-of-place in this room. The room was quite large, nowhere near the size of down the rabbit hole, but more than big enough, and so much work and detail had been put into it. Everything was made of wood and metal, the room consisted of a lot of wooden chests, tables and chairs and thick wooden doors, they were all really high quality and so well made, the room was so immersive, the music was spot on and i could really believe we had gone back in time. I was amazed how sturdy and well made everything was, and how much attention to detail had gone into making this room so great.

All the props and puzzles were right on theme, the game had a lot of practical elements to it, where we had to physically do things, and they had managed to make every one of these relevant to the story.

 

The game:

We were only here 3 days ago, when we had first come to escape reality, I had unexpectedly finished work early, so we booked two rooms last-minute and headed on through. We loved them so much that we booked two more when we got home, for a few days later. So this is our second visit to Escape Reality in a few days.

The game is for 2-6 players, again we played with 2. This was a really good number for us in this room, and despite it being one of the harder ones here, we did really well in this room, and I loved every second of it, and im glad we had a small team so we both got to see everything in the room.

This game was everything I had been wanting, and I was actually a bit sad when it was over. The puzzles were difficult at times, but perfectly logical and solvable, and fit in perfectly with the theme, a great variety of code-breaking, word, observation, practical and logic puzzles, with just the right mix of padlocks and tech. We flew through this room, needing very little help. The room had some really unique puzzles, the starting puzzle was so clever, i have no idea how they did it, and it was so easy to do, but at the same time could be difficult to figure out, as its something you may not have seen done before, or even thought was possible to do.

There were a few puzzles in the room that were a bit awkward to do, such as one where we were required to push buttons in a certain order, we ended up asking for help, we had been sure we had it correct, and it turned out we did, but we needed to press the buttons harder than we had been, this wasted a bit of our time, as we had the correct order for a while, and we had been pressing them pretty hard to start with, in the end I had to practically lean on them to make it work. Another puzzle we had an issue with (this one was more down to us) was towards the end, we had solved the final puzzle, but not realised and changed the order of it, ended up asking for a clue again only to find out we had it right to start with, and had just not left it long enough, so we spent another 5 minutes moving things round for no reason.

The puzzles in the room were so much fun, and were really satisfying to solve, I loved every minute of it, and didn’t want the game to end. After playing the two high-tech rooms here a few days ago, it was really nice to play this more traditional room, but it still had just enough tech to add that bit of extra magic to the game, and done in such a way that wasnt out-of-place in theme. After solving the final puzzle, there was one last thing to do in order to open the door, it was so simple, but so clever, and it had actually been part of the back story and wrapped everything up nicely, we remembered the story and what we were here to do, so we got it instantly, but I can imagine it being quite difficult to figure out.

I would really recommend this room to anyone, for me it was definitely one of the best rooms ive played, newbies I would take 4-5 players, there are some puzzles in there that can be tricky, and experienced players should do just fine in a team of 2.

Host, briefing and clue system:

Like the other rooms we played here, you get an iPad with your timer on it, and you can also use it to scan QR codes next to the puzzles and get a hint, but doing this has a time penalty which is added on to your final escape time. It also shows you how many puzzles will be in the game. 3 games in and we still havent used the iPad, preferring to stick to the penalty free hint system of having our host come into the room.  If you havent read my previous reviews about Escape Reality, when you escape you have to use the iPad to scan an exit code, which then records your time, and I still think this is most stressful part of the game, and a very anxious couple of seconds while you try to line up the iPad, so make sure you have the iPad in your hands when you leave or you will find yourself running back for it!

I can’t remember our hosts name! I must have asked so many times so I didn’t forget, and still can’t remember, I think its time to start taking a notepad with me just for writing down names. Our host was great, he chatted to us for ages about the rooms, was so quick getting to the room when we needed a clue, and he was already waiting for us when we got out.

Did we escape?

Yes! In 53 minutes!

The iron kingdom.jpg

Booking and prices:

We booked online, you can book several different rooms or time slots at once, just make sure you click on the right location as they are all on the same website!

Price:

2 Players – £44 (£22.00 each)
3 Players – £60 (£20.00 each)
4 Players – £72 (£18.00 each)
5 Players – £85 (£17.00 each)
6 Players – £96 (£16.00 each)

Escape Reality have a 20% discount code on their website, use ESCAPEREALITY20 when booking, it may not be around for long though!

Website:

www.escapereality.com